Understanding Marine Food Webs

Understanding Marine Food Webs

Grades 4 - 9

The transfer of energy among organisms happens daily and sustains life on this planet. The relationships among producers, consumers and decomposers maintain the flow of chemical energy that makes life possible.  This program puts a focus on marine food chains and webs, but also takes a close look at where our species fits in.

Learning standards will be met, as students:

  • Explain their roles within food webs
  • Create simple food chains for two of the Museum's whale skeletons - the right whale and sperm whale
  • Link trophic levels by creating a marine food web
  • Use computer-based interactive lessons to examine the roles of producers, consumers and decomposers

Science programs are typically 1.5 - 2 hours in length, and are available for up to 30 students at one time. If you wish to bring more than 30 students, please consider the following opportunities:

  1. Up to 30 students participate in a science program, and up to 30 students participate in a history, language arts & culture program at the Museum. The students then rotate, so each student is able to participate in both programs in one visit.

  2. Up to 30 students participate in a science program, and up to 30 students participate in a program at the National Park Visitor Center, located within walking distance of the Museum. The students then rotate, so each student is able to participate in both programs in one visit.
  3. Up to 30 students participate in a science program, and up to 30 students participate in a program at the Coalition for Buzzards Bay, located within walking distance of the Museum. The students then rotate, so each student is able to participate in both programs in one visit.

Please contact the Education Department to discuss these and other opportunities.

Links

Search and Destroy: Sperm Whale Echolocation
The Te Papa Museum in New Zealand has created a vivid, color animation that depicts how sperm whales find and capture their food in the dark depths of the ocean.

Inside Nature's Giants: Sperm Whale
Veterinary scientist Mark Evans and comparative anatomist Dr. Joy Reidenberg dissect a Sperm Whale, which stranded and died on Pegwell Bay, Kent, England.
 

 

Last Modified: December 8, 2015